Find a Provider | Print Page | Contact Us | Report Abuse | Sign In | Register
Meeting Schedule Day 4
Share |

Schedule

Day 1  | Day 2  |  Day 3  | Day 4

Sunday, October 22, 2017

7:00-8:00 AM

Awakening Qi
Practical Qi movements to apply immediately to your practice – and your own daily life.

Relax your mind, revitalize your body, and renew your spirit with QiGong! QiGong is scientifically documented to relieve pain and stress; reverse aging and paralysis; boost your immune system, your energy, sense of well being, and more. Start your day in a fun, energizing way and experience for yourself the meditative breathing and stretching exercises of “miracle healing” QiGong. Learn practical Qi tools you can apply immediately to your daily life and practice, and discover for yourself how QiGong can empower you, your staff,  your patients, and your loved ones toward greater freedom from pain. Enjoy!

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss three ways to activate your Qi; 2) Demonstrate proper meditative QiGong abdominal breathing and posture and discuss its importance; 3) Identify three principles and practices of QiGong “PMA,” positive mental attitude, and discuss their importance; 4) Demonstrate and discuss how to balance and harmonize you and your client’s Qi for release and relief of pain. 
Faculty: Nadia Linda Hole MD

 

8:05-12:35 AM

The Nuts and Bolts for a Successful Integrative Pain Management Practice
What is integrative pain management (IPM) and why should clinicians consider it to care for people in pain? Is this a viable business option for clinicians? In this four-hour workshop, the main principles of IPM and how it differs from the ways that pain is typically managed will be discussed, along with its role in team-based care. This workshop will illustrate some of the modalities that can be used in the IPM program and the evidence behind them. Presenters not only will identify appropriate integrative therapists/clinicians to deliver the care, but will provide criteria on how to select them, along with ways to customize the services and interventions to match the particular needs of the patient. Innovative business models that can significantly improve the integrative pain practice’s financial bottom line will be presented. Based on the ever-increasing new payment models whereby health systems are assuming financial risk for patient care, we will discuss how integrative pain management can get a seat at the financial able by offering great opportunities for outcome driven/cost saving strategies utilizing high touch/low tech integrative interventions. The six presentations below will be broken up by three, 30-minute panel discussions, each one addressing the content delivered in two sessions. The specific topics to be discussed and faculty are:
Welcome and Overview, Lance Luria, MD, FACP, ABOIM 
Integrative Modalities and the Evidence that Supports Them, Robert Bonakdar, MD, FACN 
Selecting the Appropriate Arrow in Your Quiver—Matching the Modality to the Condition for Optimal Benefit, Jay Sandweiss, DO 
Tools in the Toolbox: The Kinds and Varieties of Integrative Modalities Utilized, Kim Brower, MHA
Good Is the Enemy of Great: Selecting the Right Therapists for the Best Outcomes, Chuck Renner, OTR, CHT 
Getting a Seat at the Financial Table: Outcome Driven/Cost Saving Paradigms and the Role of the Physician as Manager, Lance Luria, MD, FACP, ABOIM 

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Describe how IPM differs from traditional pain management; 2) Discuss the benefits of IPM for both the clinician and the patient; 3) Define the benefits of creating an integrative pain management practice and the team members needed to provide this care; 4) Discuss the benefits of acupuncture for chronic pain; 5) Identify key supplements used to treat chronic pain; 6) Describe the benefits of an antiinflammatory diet; 7) Identify two therapies that work for low back pain; 8) Determine appropriate, evidence-based integrative medicine modalities; 9) Identify specific criteria and skills sets necessary for effective integrative medicine practitioners; 10) Discuss the basic qualifications for therapists treating chronic pain.
Faculty: Lance Luria, MD, FACP, ABOIM, Robert Bonakdar, MD, FACN, Jay Sandweiss, DO, C-NMM/OMM, DABMA, FAAMA, Chuck Renner, OTR, CHT, Kim Brower, MHA

 

 

8:05-9:05 AM

Traumatic Brain Injury—Restoring Neuroplasticity
This session will address the epidemic of brain injury and provide practical tools to assist physicians in identifying and treating trauma to the central nervous system.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Define the pathophysiology and epidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI); 2) Identify dysfunctional patterns that may be associated with an unidentified TBI; 3) Address various approaches to restore neuroplasticity in an injured brain; 4) Ignite conversation on the creation of comprehensive programs to restore function in TBI.
Faculty: Roger Mignosa, DO

 

Medical Acupuncture in Pain Medicine: Evidence and Practice
 Using a case based approach, this presentation will explore the current evidence for selected aspects of medical acupuncture and how they may be integrated into a busy pain practice to solve challenging clinical dilemmas.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss current evidence for selected domains in medical acupuncture; 2) Illustrate how evidence based medical acupuncture may be effectively integrated into an interdisciplinary pain practice to solve today’s challenging clinical presentations.
Faculty: Farshad Ahadian, MD        

 

9:10 - 10:10 AM

Is Systemic Lidocaine the New Standard of Care for Pain due to Inflammation?
Systemic lidocaine has been used successfully since the 1960s as an analgesic for central and peripheral neuropathic pain, migraine headaches, phantom limb pain or sensations, and for CRPS. We are now using it in abdominal surgeries (pre-emptively) in patients with sepsis or systemic infections from sepsis or IVDU, in cases of osteomyelitis, and in pancreatitis. Information will be presented to explain its systemic analgesic properties, but also its ability to serve effectively as an antiinflammatory agent. The latter effect likely contributes to its analgesic properties.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Converse knowledgably on lidocaine’s mechanism of action at the sodium channel; 2) Discuss the mechanisms of lidocaine’s antiinflammatory properties; 3) Explain by case example lidocaine’s effectiveness as a systemic analgesic and antiinflammatory agent; 4) Confirm the dosing strategies for systemic lidocaine as proposed by the speaker. 
Faculty: Don H. Bivins, MD

 

The Integrative Road Less Traveled: Autonomic Dysfunction and Headache
Key symptoms, clues and treatments for migraine and headache including vitamin supplementation, mindfulness, interventional treatments, and physical medicine

Practical review of autonomic circuits that relate to migraine and centralized pain, including symptoms related to sleep dysfunction, anxiety, tachycardia, temperature dysregulation, and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal dysfunction. The program will focus on key clinical symptoms that provide clues and insights toward better understanding of autonomic dysregulation.  Treatment modalities will be outlined including medication, vitamin supplementation, mindfulness, interventional treatments, and physical medicine to promote an effective, integrative toolbox for migraine and headache.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Demonstrate autonomic system effects on pain; 2) Discuss symptoms of autonomic dysfunction; 3) Illustrate treatment options for patients with autonomic dysfunction; 4) Discuss the overlap of gut and brain inflammation through the autonomic system.
Faculty: Wade Cooper, DO, FACN

 

10:30-11:30 AM

“Unlearning” Chronic Pain: Groundbreaking Concepts in Neuroscience, Medicine, and Psychology for Pain Elimination
Groundbreaking research of mind-body approaches to chronic pain

Chronic pain and associated disorders affect millions in the U.S. The bio-technological approach to these disorders has not been effective. Brain studies show that chronic pain is due to predictive coding, which is linked to stressful life events and emotions. This lecture will explain this model and discuss results from an NIH-funded trial for fibromyalgia. Dr. Schubiner will discuss how to explain this model to patients, gather the medical data required to rule out serious medical disorders, conduct detailed interviews, and make the diagnosis of a psycho-physiologic disorder. Finally, intervention techniques based upon the NIH study will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Describe how pain is processed in the brain and understand that chronic pain is often caused by learned neural pathways; 2) Recognize the relationship between pain and emotions and understand the psychological mechanisms that can create chronic pain; 3) Describe the results of a groundbreaking research study of a specific mind body approach to chronic pain; 4) Describe the four components in a mind body approach to guide clients in unlearning chronic pain.   
Faculty: Howard Schubiner, MD

 

Lessons from Chiropractic Medicine: Using Fewer High-Risk Drugs for Low Back Pain
Research behind non-pharmacological chiropractic care of low back pain and its associated with lower use of high risk drugs and reduced risk of ADEs.
The overuse of opioids for treatment of low back pain in the U.S. is associated with increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs). Among patients with low back pain, the speaker compared recipients and nonrecipients of chiropractic services with regard to likelihood of using high-risk drugs and the risk of ADEs. Nonpharmacological chiropractic care of low back pain is associated with lower use of high-risk drugs and reduced risk of ADEs. The research results will be presented, with discussion of the implications for clinical practice, health policy, and future research, and with time allowed for questions and answers.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the association between utilization of chiropractic services and use of high-risk drugs; 2) Discuss the association between utilization of chiropractic services and use of opioid analgesics; 3) Discuss the association between utilization of chiropractic services and risk of adverse drug events.  
Faculty: James M. Whedon, DC, MS

 

11:35 AM - 12:35 PM          

Retraining the Pain Brain—Sensory Biofeedback
The key to self-regulation is relaxation and being in present time. Then comes control of sensations through talking to the body, tensing and relaxing, loving it, circulating electrical energy, breathing through, expanding electromagnetic fields, collecting and releasing, balancing emotions with guided imagery, and finally, spiritual attunement.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Demonstrate autogenic training; 2) Discuss retraining with patients; 3) Demonstrate sensory biofeedback; 4) Illustrate spiritual principles of pain management.     
Faculty: C. Norman Shealy, MD, PhD

 

It's not in Your Head: Biological Rationales of Psychological Treatment for Chronic Pain
Psychological interventions for chronic pain to reduce patient resistance, enhance self-management, and improve patient-provider communication.

“They think it’s all in my head.” This is the natural assumption when given a well-meaning referral for pain psychology. This can result in resistance, conflict, distrust, and noncompliance. Biological rationales can facilitate clinical communication that can enhance motivation and reduce conflict. As scientific explanations of pain, pain management, and routine psychological skills have grown, so has our ability to provide a method for helping clients and their providers feel like they are working together on the same side. This presentation will provide a practical guide for using brief biological-based descriptions of pain and psychological tools for pain management.

Learning Objectives:
After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the biological rationales of common psychological interventions for chronic pain; 2) Discuss how using biological rationales can reduce resistance to utilizing psychological services for chronic pain; 3) Discuss which populations may be better served through the use of biological rationales; 4) Demonstrate how to implement the communication strategies in clinical practice. 
Faculty: Jill B. Fancher, PhD

 

Day 1  | Day 2  |  Day 3  | Day 4